13 Stories Down and in the Fine Print

At KHN citing the WSJ:

Federal officials said they had largely succeeded in repairing parts of the site that had most snarled users in the two months since its troubled launch, but acknowledged they only had begun to make headway on the biggest underlying problems: the system’s ability to verify users’ identities and accurately transmit enrollment data to insurers. (Emphasis mine)

Most of the prior stories were about how well Healthcare.gov is working.

Comments (13)

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  1. Joe S. says:

    Oops. Something the White House forgot to to mention.

  2. Devon Herrick says:

    The Administration has worked to make the user interface work. But, the backend (where the real transaction is supposed to take place) is still having problems. I fear that’s a public relations decision since applicants outnumber insurers.

  3. John Fembup says:

    “acknowledged they only had begun to make headway on the biggest underlying problems: the system’s ability to verify users’ identities and accurately transmit enrollment data to insurers.”

    Wait a minute. Isn’t there at least one other big problem?

    Reporting in the media and the web has suggested that the government site is particularly vulnerable to hacking . . . that hackers have easy access to all the personal information you enter on the site.

    This latest government statement is silent on that vulnerability.

    Are we to conclude that the government’s silence on vulnerability to hacking means that no such problem exists and / or such problems are now fixed?

  4. Bob Hertz says:

    Also in the back end is the ability of the government to transmit subsidy dollars on time to insurers for anyone who is to get a subsidy.

    If a person is told they have a policy on Jan 1st, do they send in the gross premium or the premium net of subsidy?

    And if they do the latter, will the insurer get the subsidy portion on a timely basis?

    According to one account I read, 27% of the applicants to the ACA do not have a regular checking account that can be drafted.

    This does not all have to happen perfectly on Jan 1st, as insurers in the individual market are used to some problems with initial premiums.

    But it has to work seamlessly pretty soon, and according to Henry Chao of CMS that programming has not started.

  5. Jackson says:

    “but acknowledged they only had begun to make headway on the biggest underlying problems: the system’s ability to verify users’ identities and accurately transmit enrollment data to insurers.”

    In other words they’re still struggling to make it actually work!

  6. Adam says:

    Just shows how far we can trust the media in this regard.

  7. Billy says:

    In my more cynical moments I wonder how much the WH paid to have those news stories run.