Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

Sen. Max Baucus: fears President Barack Obama’s health care law is headed for a “huge train wreck.”

Veterinarian punished for engaging in Internet consultations.

The $35 billion initiative to promote the use of electronic health records is actually raising costs; and that’s only one of the problems.

Doctors lobby to reduce health care labor shortage, leaving out nurses, others.

Comments (11)

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  1. Juan Felipe Martinez says:

    WE NEED MORE DOCTORS! The regulations in the Affordable Care Act are inhibiting the growth of the healthcare profession.

  2. Ron says:

    “Veterinarian punished for engaging in Internet consultations.”

    Such a ridiculous law to have–to force vets to have a person-to-person relationship. I hope this law is amended because many people could save money and engage in preventative medicine through the use of convenient consultations, such as this vet was offering.

  3. Jack says:

    35 Billion lost on EHRs is terrible piece, but it’s true. After nearly 25 years of health technologies only 9 percent of redundant information can be shared just within the VA. DoD and VA interoperability is non-existent.

  4. Harley says:

    Jack’s right, they’ve spent more than a billion dollars just on an advisory board trying to get the DoD and VA systems to where they can share information. EHRs CAN work for large integrated hospitals with in house IT capabilities, but apparently not when they’re federally managed.

  5. Buster says:

    “Veterinarian punished for engaging in Internet consultations.”

    He earned less than $3,000 per year from his online consultations. At $56 apiece, that is only about one consultation per week. What a heinous criminal he must be!

    I wonder who Texas voters can write to in order to get the petty tyrants on the Texas state veterinary board more “free time” (away from the burdens of erecting regulatory barriers to competition in the veterinary profession)?

  6. Ryan says:

    “The $35 billion initiative to promote the use of electronic health records is actually raising costs; and that’s only one of the problems.”

    Proof of government inefficiency?

  7. C.B. Sutton says:

    “Max Baucus on Obamacare”

    When I read this news story yesterday, I thought to myself, I bet you I will read this on Dr. Goodman’s blog tomorrow. Sure enough! Good pick up. Nothing much to say on the piece itself. Maybe, “I told you so”?

  8. Benedict P. says:

    The real kicker about the veterinarian losing his license for a year is that it actually appears that he might be providing better care. Yes, he isn’t giving a face-to-face consultation but he says that advantage of this treatment method is that it gives him time to read the scientific literature and think over the problem, rather than making a quick decision as he would in a face-to-face consultation.

    And, many of his clients are in far flung parts of the world that do not have access to a veterinarian, begging the question, why the regulation?

  9. Studebaker says:

    Doctors lobby to reduce health care labor shortage, leaving out nurses, others…

    So-called “scope of practice” bills already introduced are expected to be among the most hotly contested this year, as doctors fight to hold onto their role as gatekeepers to medical care.

    I looked at the summary for the five bills and nothing in them had anything to do with expanding “scope of practice.”

  10. Gabriel Odom says:

    On EHRs:
    “The report also cites difficulties in ensuring that hospitals, doctors’ offices and other providers can effectively use each other’s records. Greater information-sharing is aimed at reducing medical errors like drug interactions, as well as cutting back on redundant testing, but various systems aren’t communicating with each other as needed”

    The issue here is that hospitals still primarily use a “best of breed” EHR setup. This means that they chose 35 or more of the best softwares for each part of the hospital. This automatically leads to problems in the patient chart, as the middleware between these software suites are problematic at best. For instance, the gastroenterology suite does not talk to their surgery scheduling or the nursing software. This means that the meds administered in the Endo OR will have to be manually entered by the recovery nurse into whatever nursing software the hospital is using – making med reconciliation unnecessarily difficult.

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