Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

Prediction: life osunearth1-617x416n Earth will be over somewhere between 1.75 billion and 3.25 billion years from now.

A physician faces disciplinary action for seeing patients on Skype.

Citing ObamaCare, Cleveland Clinic to cut $300M, warns of layoffs.

Guess why business is booming for part-time and contract labor?

Between 210,000 and 440,000 patients each year who go to the hospital for care suffer some type of preventable harm that contributes to their death.

Comments (20)

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  1. JD says:

    “Prediction: life on earth will be over somewhere between 1.75 billion and 3.25 billion years from now.”

    That gives us plenty of time to get out.

  2. JD says:

    “A physician faces disciplinary action for seeing patients on Skype.”

    Why? This sounds like a great way to reduce costs without sacrificing much quality.

    • Dewaine says:

      I agree with you, but this may have had something to do with it:

      ” A number of other factors add color to the board’s action, including that the physician was prescribing controlled substances as a result of these visits and that one of his patients died. “

    • Jackson says:

      A lot of people actually pay for the privilege of talking to their doctor outside the examination room.

  3. JD says:

    “Citing ObamaCare, Cleveland Clinic to cut $300M, warns of layoff.”

    And the beat goes on…

  4. JD says:

    “Between 210,000 and 440,000 patients each year who go to the hospital for care suffer some type of preventable harm that contributes to their death.”

    Sad. More choice, mobility and competition translates to more accountability and higher quality. Many of these deaths are preventable.

  5. Buster says:

    Between 210,000 and 440,000 patients each year who go to the hospital for care suffer some type of preventable harm that contributes to their death.

    This just in…Most of these patients are also engaging in behaviors that are detrimental to their health, and have been for a good part of their life.

    • Adam says:

      That seems too callous a response though. None of us act perfectly in regards to our health.

      • John R. Graham says:

        That is true. Nevertheless, the figure lends itself to sensationalism. Although it’s obvious that we should seek to improve quality, it should also be clear that risks have to be taken by physicians when they treat patients.

        If no physician ever treated a patient, the rate of adverse events would be zero. Similarly, if nobody ever drove a car, the number of traffic fatalities would be zero.

        Also, “contributing” to a patient’s death is a bit of a wriggly verb, isn’t it? Suppose a patient presents in the ER near death, and the ER physician (racing against the clock) does something that’s deemed harmful – in hindsight? Would it have been better for him to have done nothing? In come cases, perhaps – but not likely.

  6. Adam says:

    “Prediction: life on earth will be over somewhere between 1.75 billion and 3.25 billion years from now.”

    This completely writes out human ingenuity from the equation however. Granted, surviving that long will be a challenge in itself, but if we succeed then the technology we will likely have at our disposal will probably make solving that problem child’s play.