Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

air-pollutionEliminating all greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. forever would impact warming by less than one fifth of one degree by 2100.

Federal health care lobbying has declined to “only” $130 million.

Septic (blood) infections involved in up to half U.S. hospital deaths.

Secret wait list cover-up spreads to more VA hospitals; records destroyed.

Big Brother? U.S. gave Medicare patients’ private medical information to local officials during New Orleans public-health scare.

Comments (13)

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  1. Jessica says:

    Sadly, from the first article, it seems that have reached the tipping point, the point of no return on greenhouse gas emissions.

    • Tom says:

      Well, would you rather have our economy suffer in the wake of minimal benefits from mitigation? Personally, I would sleep better at night by adapting rather than trying to mitigate. It is much more effective and works with, not against, the economy.

      • Jessica says:

        I didn’t know there was a difference between adaptation and mitigation.

        • Tom says:

          Sure there is. Mitigation focuses on the causes of global warming and attempts to cut CO2 emissions. Adaptation focuses on the effects of global warming and attempts to “adapt” to the changing climate, hopefully adjusting before the full effects can harm them. However, since global warming seems to have such a long time-frame and there is not a general consensus on the degree-raising aspect of the topic, it is unlikely that the effects will be felt soon.

  2. Mitch says:

    It is sad that we can do so little to prevent it ourselves. China, India, and other developing economies without standards would continue on polluting long after we renovated our system. It is tragic, since Greenland is melting at an alarming rate, and some scientist say that the arctic is beginning to show the signs that Greenland did a few years ago. The rise in sea levels resulting from that ice melting would be devastating to more than our economy, it would be devastating to the world.

  3. Mitch says:

    Perhaps some funding should be dedicated to sepsis research. If it constitutes 1/5 of all healthcare costs, then a quick and effective treatment is direly needed.

  4. Devon Herrick says:

    Septic (blood) infections involved in up to half U.S. hospital deaths.

    Sepsis is increasingly common. I wonder if this is a case of medical science keeping very sick elderly patients alive longer — allowing fragile immune system to contract sepsis?

  5. Dianna R. says:

    This whole VA scandal is so upsetting! I can’t believe this negligence lead to all these people’s deaths!! It breaks my heart.

    • Erik says:

      Let’s put this in perspective. How many people do you think die waiting for medical treatment in the private sector?

      This is fear mongering by the right leaning media.

      • TYE says:

        Erik, this isn’t fear mongering, rather observations on data. The VA hospitals were backlogged with more than 300,000 cases, and employees tried to cover up wait times by manipulating records.

        • Remy says:

          Good point TYE. It truly shows why the government should not intervene with health programs and healthcare in general. The same could be said about Medicaid and Medicare. Quality and access are minimal in all three program!