Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

Teacher credentials don’t matter.

One-quarter of all Medicare claims submitted by skilled nursing facilities include errors and most of those were “upcoded” to result in higher payments.

FDA could have prevented the meningitis outbreak.

Comments (12)

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  1. Peterson says:

    “Teacher credentials don’t matter”

    I agree with allowing people who have a received bachelors degree to be able to teach. If the person is performing poorly, fire them. Allow for school administrators to make the best decisions for the STUDENTS!

  2. Cindy says:

    Full disclosure: I’m not a subscriber so I can’t see the full WSJ article on the meningitis outbreak, but me sense is this compounding thing is a little sketchy.

    How could this happen?

  3. Jennifer says:

    “…reform advocates argue that having such institutions for teacher certification are discouraging bright young students from pursuing a career in education” I don’t think having these institutions for teacher certification is the only reason discouraging certain students from pursuing a career in education. Perhaps the low salary that most teachers are known for receiving is another major reason why this profession doesn’t have such a high demand among prospective student.

  4. Chris says:

    FDA could have prevented the meningitis outbreak.

    Could have, should have, would have…

  5. Studebaker says:

    Teacher credentials don’t matter.

    Unfortunately, the education industry is mostly concerned with feathering its own nest, protecting teaching jobs and following the latest education fads. I respect good teachers — there are many of them. But, teachers’ unions are prone to protect bad teachers assuming that any attack on a teacher is an attack on all teachers. Teachers unions would have more credibility if they were proactive at identifying members who were incompetent and either helping them excel or booting them out.

  6. Robert says:

    One-quarter of all Medicare claims submitted by skilled nursing facilities include errors and most of those were “upcoded” to result in higher payments.

    How many times does this have to make news before something is done about it? It just keeps happening.

  7. seyyed says:

    yeah, there is hardly a difference in student achievement between teachers that went to a top college in education and those that served in teach for america for a while. what needs to happen is a willingness by administrators to fire a teacher based on performance to create incentives to improve teaching methods.

    Also troubling is the fact that most people don’t view teaching as a career they want to be in because of how menial and unfulfilling the work has become.

  8. Alex says:

    “FDA could have prevented the meningitis outbreak.”

    I’m not surprised. Now, what would surprise me would be if they acknowledged it and took responsibility.

  9. August says:

    Licencing bad!

  10. Alice says:

    Great graph in “Which hurts more in the short run, tax hikes or spending cuts?”

    I hope this evidence in considered in the up coming negotiations.

  11. August says:

    “The $1.5 billion in improper payments represented nearly 6% of the $26.9 billion paid overall to skilled-nursing facilities in 2009, according to the report. Medicare’s overall payouts for these services rose to $32.2 billion in fiscal year 2012.”

  12. Baker says:

    “The agency (FDA) has been focused on enforcement activity that could instigate legal showdowns and set judicial precedents that would expand FDA power over the full scope of the practice of pharmacy”

    Enforcing less regulation and instead suing to regulate more: ironic.