Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

Hospital patients and their families rarely are informed when medication errors occur.

Very little of the money collected from tobacco taxes or the tobacco settlement is being used on anti-tobacco programs.

Mental health experts say New York’s  gun control law might interfere with treatment of potentially dangerous people and even discourage them from seeking help.

Comments (6)

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  1. Vanessa says:

    Hospital patients and their families rarely are informed when medication errors occur.

    This is outrageous! This is what happens when you have physicians that care more about themselves than their patients. They don’t disclose errors to avoid lawsuits and any other negative consequences, yet there’s nobody really looking after the well-being of the patient in question. And these are the so-called physicians we are supposed to trust….Perhaps a class on professionalism and ethics would suit them all well…

  2. Jonathan says:

    On the second link,

    I have heard this from so many different sources already, and after hearing different arguments I have come to the realization that governments are not raising tobacco taxes with the intention of funding “anti-tobacco programs”. Instead, I’ve come to think that they do it with the purpose of keeping people from buying as much, if any, tobacco since it will come the time when they can’t afford it anymore because taxes are so high. However, smoking is a drug, and addicts are willing to pay as much as they need to have access to this drug…that’s just a fact, and it doesn’t matter how high taxes go, they will still find a way to buy it.

  3. Studebaker says:

    Hospital patients and their families rarely are informed when medication errors occur.

    Doctors make errors all day long; everybody does, nobody is perfect. The difference is a matter of degree. A major errors should be disclosed.

    We should demand a high degree of accuracy and professionalism. However, 100% error free medical care is really not achievable and would be very expensive.

  4. Dylan says:

    That makes 2 of us! There are days after reading the news I feel a general malaise.

    I’d love to see a follow up with headlines you were happy to see. :-)

  5. Andrew O says:

    Hospital patients and their families rarely are informed when medication errors occur.

    Even though medication errors occur, it should be compulsory for doctors and hospitals to notify patients. It’s too much of a common sense and non-debatable issue and it’s sickening it’s actually a problem in our society.

  6. Jordan says:

    On the second link.. it’s the same everywhere. The Right of Way and franchise fees levied against PUCs are several times the actual cost of maintaining right of ways. Just another way to fill general revenue coffers.