Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

Only 6% of U.S. workers are very confident that future Medicare benefits will be equal in value to what seniors receive today.

Workplace wellness programs may not save companies money.

A growing number of doctors have begun holding group appointments — seeing up to a dozen patients with similar medical concerns all at once.

What Medicare pays for an ambulance trip is highly variable, ranging from $99 to $1,218 per transport.

Comments (13)

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  1. Harley says:

    On the third link, unless it’s AA, NA, or SA — that’s awful. My medical concerns are my own, I don’t want to shout my potentially embarrassing issues from a mountain top..

  2. Jack says:

    I like that NCPA blogs link to their sources. The first link, frustratingly, doesn’t have direct links to the research. Now I have to go track it all down to see if it’s reputable. Boo.

  3. Patel says:

    @ The Wellness Article

    It is hard to measure wellness outcomes since it constitutes intangible factors.

  4. Desai says:

    @ 6% not confident

    I am not surprised, we cannot afford it, so we know what we are going to get will sub-par service.

  5. Anthony Sombers says:

    “Workplace wellness programs may not save companies money.”

    Yes, this has been discussed and studied a lot lately, but, as Patel suggests, it is incredibly hard to assert any projections on this topic when it comes to how a wellness program is benefiting an individual’s health. There are several variables that would need to be controlled in order to even have a minimal economic suggestion, which cannot be done until these programs are in effect.

  6. Robert Tiel says:

    “What Medicare pays for an ambulance trip is highly variable, ranging from $99 to $1,218 per transport.”

    Another example of how a lack of a fixed price based on demand and competition in the health field is causing ridiculous price variances that ends up affecting the patient’s pocket.

  7. Gabriel Odom says:

    I would not share a doctor’s appointment in a million years.
    Not happening.

  8. Buster says:

    Workplace wellness programs may not save companies money.

    If financial health is your goal, the people who most benefit from workplace wellness programs are the purveyors of workplace wellness programs.

  9. Studebaker says:

    Workplace wellness programs may not save companies money.

    I always thought the way workplace wellness programs save money was by creating a corporate culture hostile to the unhealthy workers — thus making them uncomfortable and running them off!

  10. Devon Herrick says:

    “A growing number of doctors have begun holding group appointments — seeing up to a dozen patients with similar medical concerns all at once.”

    This is an interesting concept. Although I tend to share Gabriel’s “ick” factor, for some conditions this is actually a good idea. Conditions like diabetes management, where people suffer from common problems, may benefit from the longer time a group meeting allows and the support a group can provide.

  11. Sandeep says:

    @ the Workplace wellness programs may not save companies money & A growing number of doctors have begun holding group appointments — seeing up to a dozen patients with similar medical concerns all at once.

    I think we should flip it, perhaps wellness programs should be more group oriented. Just may be, the social pressure that comes from a group can give way to consistent health behaviors.

  12. Gabriel Odom says:

    Devon, aside from the “ick” factor, I only see this feasible in managed care/patient education scenarios. In a hospital or clinic, registered nurses already handle this type of medical care, so I don’t see the need for doctors to be present – save as a telecommuting advisor of sorts. Any other situation would have a myriad of legal encumbrances, without even counting HIPAA regulations. Each patient would have to sign a waiver that they choose to receive shared care, and a separate form to keep any divulged information within the appropriate confidence. People would need to be able to feel comfortable knowing that their information will not leave the room.

  13. Studebaker says:

    A growing number of doctors have begun holding group appointments — seeing up to a dozen patients with similar medical concerns all at once.

    If I ever agree to a group doctor’s appointment, when the nurse comes to the waiting room to escort me to the exam room, she better not ask me to undress and put on a paper gown… otherwise I’m leaving!