Healthy Eaters Choose Unhealthy Foods, and Other Links

“When you put a healthy option up there on an otherwise unhealthy menu, not only do we not pick it, but its presence on the menu leads us to swing over and pick something that’s worse for us than we normally would.”

Is the Internet increasing prostitution?

Company buys an orphan drug for $146 million; nets $4 billion for its shareholders.

Of 48 dire predictions about sequestration’s impact, just 11 have come true. (And that’s with the White House trying to make the cuts as painful as possible.) HT: Tyler Cowen.

Comments (11)

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  1. Randall says:

    My guess is that healthy options on unhealthy menus are the items picked more than each of the unhealthy items.

  2. Howard says:

    “Is the Internet increasing prostitution?”

    My guess is that the internet increases everything.

  3. Richard says:

    I’d bet a whole hell of a lot that people who see a “healthy” item on a generally unhealthy menu would tend to believe (without looking at the calorie counts) that the whole menu must be “healthier”, and so they can eat what seems to be bad elsewhere (hey, there’s a salad on here, my bacon filled tater tots must have less calories!).

    Also, quite frankly, I don’t know many people who go to these places with unhealthy menus to get “healthy” alternatives, other than rather infrequently.

  4. Buster says:

    Is the Internet increasing prostitution?

    The internet has decreased the transactions cost of both suppliers, and those with a demand for the service. Just as the internet has increased the purchase of goods received by mail, it has also facilitated other transactions.

    • Stella Baskomb says:

      “The internet has decreased the transactions cost”

      I wonder how the “suppliers” of these particular services account for the obvious risk of death in their transaction costs?

      Seems to me – by ignoring them.

  5. Studebaker says:

    “The internet has decreased the transactions cost”

    The internet has also decreased the transactions cost of match making (hopefully with less risk of death than for prostitution).

    I can sign up for a service, prepare my best marketing pitch, and screen potential candidates. In the past I merely hoped to meet someone fun. Lately I learned I don’t have to settle for that mismatched set of criteria.

    The same is true of vacation destination and lodging. I can peruse locations, lodging and chose a location. The owners don’t have to advertise through the mail or provide a huge cut to a management service.

    I can study reviews from others on restaurants. It’s truly hard to imagine life any other way. But I suspect businesses that relied on entrenched habits, established patterns of commerce with a high barrier to entry and a high transactions cost to match old buyers with new sellers have not fared as well.

  6. Kris says:

    “Is the Internet increasing prostitution?”

    - I definitely think it increase awareness for those looking.. Now you can go on craigslist and solicit almost without restrictions.

  7. Dewaine says:

    “Is the Internet increasing prostitution?”

    Once again the market finds a way.

  8. Kris says:

    On the healthy choice story..

    - I don’t know if I believe all that psychological stuff. If I want to eat healthy, I will. If I don’t want to eat healthy, I wont. Simple as that.

  9. Dewaine says:

    “Of 48 dire predictions about sequestration’s impact, just 11 have come true. (And that’s with the White House trying to make the cuts as painful as possible.)”

    The whole debate was stupid. If we need to make the cuts, they need to be made. Of course there will be some short term pain.