Heart Disease Common in Historic Times, and Other Links

137 mummies from four cultures spanning 4,000 years challenge the widely held assumption that cardiovascular disease is largely a malady of current times.

Internet better than FDA for alerts to drug side effects.

Do animals get all the same diseases as humans?

Comments (12)

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  1. Benedict Popplewell says:

    “Mummies”

    See! So poor diet has nothing to do with it then. It’s just human nature. Is what people will say as they cram another Big Burger down their gullet.

  2. Christian Boozer says:

    Do animals get all the same diseases as humans?

    Interesting that we are finding that ailments are common to other animals, not just humans. This highlights the fact that we are all living breathing creatures coexisting in a symbiotic relationship marked by our sharing of more than we often care to think.

  3. Anthony Sombers says:

    “Internet better than FDA for alerts to drug side effects.

    The F.D.A. asks physicians to report side effects through a system known as the Adverse Event Reporting System. But its scope is limited by the fact that data is generated only when a physician notices something and reports it. ”

    This says a lot about how inefficient the FDA is.

  4. Ray Williams says:

    “Do animals get all the same diseases as humans?”

    I think there is a lot we can learn from animals, not just in the realm of diseases and health.

  5. H. James Prince says:

    On the FDA, I present the following quip:

    “Let us never forget that all drugs recalled by the FDA were once shown to be ‘safe and effective’ by the FDA.”

  6. John Kumar says:

    @ The Internet vs FDA

    I am not surprised, with effective Data mining one can string together and make sense of very complex conditions. And because the web is an easy place to ask questions and post comments, it becomes the best place where millions of people may be talking about the same conditions, this produces lots of information regarding a particular drug or condition.

  7. John Kumar says:

    @ The animal and human diseases

    Interesting yet scary article. It reminded me of the bird flu epidemic, how the combination of human virus mixed with the bird virus produced a deadly strain that ultimately killed numerous people.

  8. Jamison says:

    “Internet better than FDA for alerts to drug side effects.”

    – Web Md is pretty clutch when I’m in need of an instant diagnosis.

  9. Gabriel Odom says:

    Concerning the mummies with heart disease – I believe it was the wise King Solomon who said “There is nothing new under the sun.”

    I am never surprised whenever scientists discover something “new”. According to Plato’s Theory of Forms, we never create anything new, we simply discover what has already existed as an idea. Many of the diseases and cures scientists find have been waiting there all along.

  10. Jacqueline says:

    Internet better than FDA for alerts to drug side effects.

    After reading this article, I couldn’t help but to feel a little confused as to whether online information can be reliable or not.
    We hear all the time how we should never look up symptoms online if we are feeling sick, because whatever we may find on the Internet will more likely be misleading and not realiable at all. We should “go straight to our physician.” However, now we see that the information the Internet provides on drugs side effects can infact be realiable? To what extent can whatever Google tell us be trustworthy?

  11. Buster says:

    137 mummies from four cultures spanning 4,000 years… had …cardiovascular disease…

    This is very interesting. People who were physically active and had far fewer food options and generally consumed far less meat had heart disease.

  12. Floccina says:

    137 mummies from four cultures spanning 4,000 years challenge the widely held assumption that cardiovascular disease is largely a malady of current times.

    It was shocking to me that people were surprised by this.