Hits and Misses

Indians have a new an-indian-voter-casts-herchoice when they go to the polls: None of the above.

Doctors don’t like New Jersey: The state only kept about one-third of the doctors who were educated and trained there.

Guest workers and outsourcing are being used to complete ObamaCare infrastructure.

Short-term unemployment is actually less than it was in 2007; the problem is long-term unemployment.

Comments (15)

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  1. Dewaine says:

    “At present, voting none of the above is just informational, i.e. none of the above is never “elected” even if it gets a majority, although the option to vote NOTA may change the outcome of the election. In the future a NOTA majority might signal a new election.”

    So, the effect is the same as not voting at all.

    • JD says:

      Looks like it. I get the spirit of what they are doing, but it looks to be only slightly more impactful then what we do when we don’t like the candidates.

    • Billy says:

      Exactly. Seems like a waste. It only makes sense if voting is compulsory.

  2. Dewaine says:

    “Doctors don’t like New Jersey: The state only kept about one-third of the doctors who were educated and trained there.”

    No surprise, it has horrendous Medicaid reimbursement rates and heavy-handed regulators.

    • Perry says:

      As one poster pointed out in the comments on that piece, other states will be joining NJ with the ACA effect on medical practices.

      • JD says:

        True, ObamaCare will definitely exacerbate this problem, but the doctors have to go somewhere. Some will come to non-expanding states, but the biggest change in physician supply will come from doctors not entering the profession.

  3. Dewaine says:

    “Guest workers and outsourcing are being used to complete ObamaCare infrastructure.”

    I have no problem with this. Hire with cost effectiveness in mind. We should never expand government to “stimulate the economy”, it just doesn’t work well.

    • JD says:

      I can see why this looks bad from a political point of view, but I’m with you. Our government needs to be run much more like a business than a charity.

      • Adam says:

        The problem is that a business must always act economically, even if it’s not in the best interest of the stakeholders, whereas the government must act in the best interest of the stakeholders even when its not economical.

  4. JD says:

    “Short-term unemployment is actually less than it was in 2007; the problem is long-term unemployment.”

    And long-term unemployment is worse, we don’t want people drug along for years and years.

    • Dewaine says:

      This has a lot to do with the way that we tried to stimulate growth. Part-time work and government spending are great for short bursts of employment opportunities, but long-term growth is rarely achieved this way.

  5. Jackson says:

    “Doctors don’t like New Jersey: The state only kept about one-third of the doctors who were educated and trained there.”

    Maybe it’s another factor than how much doctors like it, such as cost of education?

  6. Studebaker says:

    Short-term unemployment is actually less than it was in 2007; the problem is long-term unemployment.

    I didn’t realize that two-thirds of the unemployed have been without work for 6 months or less. Only one-third have been unemployed longer than 6 months. I wonder how many of those have been without a job for more than, say, two years? Basically, the chronically, long-term unemployed are few and far between.