Hits and Misses

Costdog-1 to clone a dog: $100,000.

More lawlessness: Medicare Advantage plans will get a 0.4% increase in premiums instead of the 1.9% cut the ACA seems to require.

Is Starbuck’s recycling your paper cup? Probably not.

Consumer driven health care: There are about 1,600 walk-in medical clinics across the country and the number is projected to double in the next three years.

Comments (18)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Ralph G says:

    I cannot believe that someone is willing to spend $100,000 for a dog. It is an outrageous amount of money for a pet, especially if we consider that there is no certainty that the cloned dog will act the same as its “natural” counterpart. It’s the epitome of human absurdity.

  2. Walter Q. says:

    “Cost to clone a dog: $100,000.”

    This can also go under as a “Headline I Wish I Hadn’t Seen.”

  3. Perry says:

    “Consumer driven health care: There are about 1,600 walk-in medical clinics across the country and the number is projected to double in the next three years.”

    McDonalds medicine, just what we need.

  4. Andrea P says:

    There is something to highlight about the article of Starbucks. Recycling is hard. We cannot expect to believe that just because a firm sells a lot of recyclable products, it is capable of recycling. It was an amazing marketing campaign, but not a realistic goal that matched their strategy.

  5. James M. says:

    “Good intentions don’t turn used Starbucks cups into new ones — profit motives do. And for now, there’s no money in it.”

    You would think a coffee giant like Starbucks would have some money to recycle their cups. However, as stated in the article, it is more difficult than just “recycling.”

    • Jay says:

      “Starbucks said in its 2013 Global Responsibility Report that it wasn’t going to meet its recycling goals in 2015 — if ever.”

      Broken promises. Broken promises everywhere,

    • Paul V says:

      There is something to highlight about the article of Starbucks. Recycling is hard. We cannot expect to believe that just because a firm sells a lot of recyclable products, it is capable of recycling. It was an amazing marketing campaign, but not a realistic goal that matched their strategy.

  6. Bill B. says:

    “Currently there are about 1,600 walk-in medical clinics across the country in drug and big-box stores and supermarkets”

    Judging by CVS claim earlier to add more medical clinics in their locations, looks like there are more to come. Drive thru health care for the win.

  7. Thomas C says:

    MinuteClinics is the future of healthcare. With a fast-paced society and a culture that hails convenience, these new clinics are the answer to the needs of the patients. It’s cheaper, faster and equally effective. Doctors shouldn’t oppose this as it will free them to dedicate more time to those patients that need more specialized attention.

    • Veronica O says:

      Agree, this should be a wakeup call for doctors. It tells them that they are doing something wrong or are lacking to address something that is valuable for the costumers.