New ICD-10 Codes

W56.21xD: Bitten by orca, subsequent encounter

Z62.891: Sibling rivalry

V97.33XD: Sucked into jet engine, subsequent encounter

W61.92: Struck by other birds

Z63.1: Problems in relationship with in-laws

W45.8XXA: Other foreign body or object entering through skin, initial encounter

V52.2XXA: Person on outside of pick-up truck or van injured in collision with two- or three-wheeled motor vehicle in nontraffic accident, initial encounter

X92.0: Assault by drowning and submersion while in bathtub

Source: MedPage Today.

Comments (25)

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  1. BHS says:

    Bah! Those make me laugh. If Z63.1 lands you in the hospital, that doesn’t sound too good!

  2. Lucas says:

    Tilikum got his own insurance code

  3. Jeff C says:

    Are the orcas attacking more frequent or simply before no one survived? I don’t understand.

  4. Wally says:

    A foreign object could be so many things!

  5. Kevin F says:

    It seems as if family relations have worsened over the years. These new codes reflect it.

  6. Andrew says:

    “W61.92: Struck by other birds”

    Is this an ICD code for birds? If it was for humans, are they being struck by more than one bird? What other birds would their be?

    • Luca T says:

      What are the differences between birds and “other” birds?

      • Giancarlo R says:

        I wonder what would the patient say to the doctor? I was attacked by an “other” bird? Wouldn’t it be better to say I was attacked by another bird?

  7. Perry says:

    CYI-CRY1010: Head injury from doctor beating head against wall, multiple encounters.

  8. Jay says:

    “V97.33XD: Sucked into jet engine, subsequent encounter”

    Apparently this is a thing.

  9. Perry says:

    It begs the question:

    Is this for real?

  10. Yancey Ward says:

    I am guessing code V97.33XD is only used at the morgue.

  11. Linda Gorman says:

    Seems like you’d need access to the police report in order to properly code some of these.

  12. John R. Graham says:

    Simplicity is the ally of effectiveness; while complexity is its enemy. I expect that these more detailed codes will lead to less accurate, rather than more accurate diagnoses.

    Future research will surely determine that providers will set up keyboard shortcuts so that they can quickly enter the dozen or so most common diagnoses that present at their practices. Most other diagnoses will be shoehorned into these diagnoses for the sake of convenience – especially those for which the treatment is the same.

    BTW, what happens if your troubled relationship with your in-laws results in them throwing you off the ship on an Alaskan cruise, resulting in Orca bites?