Tag: "doctors"

Hits and Misses

Smiling NurseThree more states — Connecticut, Nebraska and New York — are in the process of allowing nurse practitioners to work without oversight from a doctor, in an effort to alleviate physician shortages.

Tom Sargent summarizes economics in 335 words. Or is it 297 words?

eHealth, Inc., an online insurance broker, is ObamaCare’s biggest winner.

If we had a drug to delay Alzheimer’s by five years, annual treatment costs would drop by almost half a trillion dollars a year.

How Well Do We Match Medical Student’s with Residencies?

Amy Ho at Forbes writes:

StethoscopeThis year, 5.6% of US allopathic (MD) seniors did not match, and 22.3% of U.S. osteopathic (DO) seniors did not match. On the whole, 25.0% of applicants in the NRMP Match did not match — with a 25% unemployment rate, how successful is the Match, really?

This system is highly wasteful. It incurs massive costs for hospitals and students through the interview process, precludes contract negotiations that could optimize value for both parties and results in depressed wages for young physicians. Additionally, it incurs significant opportunity cost in trading interviews for educational senior year curricula, causes undue duress for applicants and their families and contributes to decreased quality of care in physicians unsatisfied with results of the Match.

Full piece worth reading.

Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

nutrition-labelAre serving sizes on food packages intentional attempts to mislead us? No, they are dictated by the government.

Medicare kept paying dozens of doctors after they were suspended or terminated from state Medicaid programs or were indicted or charged with fraud.

Terminal cancer patients in Russia are sent home to die; can’t get pain medication; some are committing suicide. (HT: Jason Shafrin)

Patients at risk: More than 100,000 doctors, nurses, medical technicians, and healthcare aides abuse prescription drugs.

We’re Looking More and More like Canada

doctor-mom-and-sonPatients — and physicians — say they feel the time crunch as never before as doctors rush through appointments as if on roller skates to see more patients and perform more procedures to make up for flat or declining reimbursements. It’s not unusual for primary care doctors’ appointments to be scheduled at 15-minute intervals. Some physicians who work for hospitals say they’ve been asked to see patients every 11 minutes. And the problem may worsen as millions of consumers who gained health coverage through the Affordable Care Act begin to seek care — some of whom may have seen doctors rarely, if at all, and have a slew of untreated problems.  (KHN)

Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

When America’s joint surgeons were challenged to come up with a list of unnecessary procedures in their field, their selections shared one thing: none significantly impacted their incomes.

Kathleen Sebelius for U.S. Senate?

Income Inequality Institute creates more inequality by paying Paul Krugman $25,000 a month — no teaching required.

What Are We Getting for the $30 Billion We Are Spending On Electronic Health Records?

electronic-medical-recordIn 2009, the federal government budgeted $30 billion to incentivize doctors and hospitals to install electronic health records and use them “meaningfully”. Here are the results from Boston’s Brigham & Women’s Hospital — one of the leading academic medical centers in the country:

Of 858 physicians, 540 (63%) were “meaningful users”. Meaningful use was associated with marginally better quality for 2 measures, worse quality for 2 measures, and not associated with better or worse quality for 3 measures.

Meaningful use of electronic health records was correlated with better control of cholesterol in patients with diabetes and of blood pressure in hypertensive patients. The meaningful-use group provided worse treatment of asthma and depression than the non-MU group did.

HT: Ken Terry, Medscape.

Being Uninsured is Better than Being on Medicaid to Get a Doctor’s Appointment

doc-with-patientPosing as patients, researchers made almost 13,000 calls to doctors’ offices in ten states, seeking appointments for a variety of ailments. For those posing as privately insured patients, they got appointments 85 percent of the time. For those posing as patients on Medicaid, they only got appointments 58 percent of the time. Researchers also posed as uninsured patients who were willing to pay in full at the time of the appointment.

The result? 78 percent were successful (for appointments costing more than $75) — 36 percent better than those posing as Medicaid patients and quite close to those posing as privately insured.

Doctors Push Back on Release of Data

doctor-xray-2Doctors reacted swiftly and indignantly to Wednesday’s release of government records revealing unprecedented details about Medicare payments to physicians…The top 10 doctors alone received a combined $121.4 million for Medicare Part B payments in 2012…In interviews, many of the doctors said they were just passing through the payment to drug companies. Some said they were unfairly singled out even though they were billing for an entire practice. And still others disputed the accuracy of Medicare data. (Washington Post)

Where Are The Medicare Dollars Going?

A recent analysis of Medicare data provided to The New York Times shows that two percent of doctors earn twenty-four percent of Medicare payments.

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Hits and Misses

Pediatrician Examining ToddlerA medical student wants “to do the greatest good for the greatest number.” What kind of doctor should he/she become? Tyler Cowen answers. So does David Henderson.

The health co-ops are failing.

Can teledentistry actually work?

Eli Lilly’s answer to fake drugs: A $110 million bar code system with secret codes.