Tag: "health insurance"

Federal Courts Zig and Zag on Obamacare Tax Credits

index1Obamacare opponents’ hearts rose this morning, as a three-judge panel of the DC Circuit Court of Appeals struck down the power of federal Obamacare exchanges to pay out tax credits to health insurers who sign up beneficiaries for subsidized Obamacare coverage. Because most states declined to set up their own Obamacare health insurance exchanges, subsidies to insurers would have come to a screaming halt in most of the country. Opponents have long hoped that such a decision would force the Administration back to the negotiating table with Congress.

However, merely a couple of hours later, the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, VA upheld the Administration’s position: That federal exchanges have the same powers as state exchanges to pay out subsidies to health insurers. The Administration plans to appeal the DC panel’s decision to the entire DC Circuit, en banc (i.e. all eleven judges).

Yippee! Medicare Won’t Go Bust Until 2030!

The latest Congressional Budget Office’s latest Long-Term Budget Outlook now asserts that Medicare’s so-called “Trust fund”. Talk about kicking the can down the road!

As the chart below shows, the problem is not that the “trust fund” will go bust in any given year, but that the federal government is borrowing money to finance consumption. “Other non-interest spending” includes major infrastructure and defense, tasks which constitutionally and under a proper economic understanding fall to the federal government. These were the purposes for which the Founders gave Congress the power to borrow money in the people’s name. Borrowing to finance seniors’ healthcare consumption does nothing for future generations’ prosperity.

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How Many Uninsured Texans Signed Up For Obamacare? Maybe 3 Percent of Those Eligible

The Left often attacks Texas as a holding pen of uninsured people. 5.7 million residents do not have health insurance. Yet only 733,757 signed up for Obamacare. And many of them dropped or lost insurance that they had before Obamacare launched. John Davidson of the Texas Public Policy Foundation figures that maybe only three percent of eligible, uninsured Texans signed up for Obamacare. According to Davidson, “The most likely reason is cost. Premiums on the exchange are significantly higher than average pre-ACA premiums on the individual market in Texas. Although subsidies offset these premium costs for some Texans, those earning about 250 percent of the federal poverty limit (FPL), or $29,175 per year, cannot expect their subsidy to significantly reduce premiums.”

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Health Costs in Canada Increased 2.85 Times Faster Than Inflation in the Last Decade

New research from The Fraser Institute shows that health costs in Canada increased 53.3 percent since 2014. During the same period, consumer price inflation increased 18.7 percent and cash incomes rose only 34.7 percent. And the taxes taken to fund the single-payer system have risen significantly:

Health care in Canada is not “free.” Canadians often misunderstand the true cost of our public health care system. This occurs partly because Canadians do not incur direct expenses for their use of health care, and partly because Canadians cannot readily determine the value of their contribution to public health care insurance because there is no “dedicated” health insurance tax.

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How Much Did ObamaCare Increase Your Premiums? A New County-By-County Calculator

The Manhattan Institute has published an interactive map that shows ObamaCare’s effect on premiums for individual health insurance in almost every U.S. county. On average, premiums have increased by 49 percent. However, there is huge variance:

Among men, the county with the greatest increase in insurance prices from 2013 to 2014 was Buchanan County, Missouri, about 45 miles north of Kansas City: 271 percent. Among women, the “winner” was Goodhue County, Minnesota, about an hour southwest of Minneapolis: 200 percent. Overall, the counties of Nevada, North Carolina, Minnesota, and Arkansas haven experienced the largest rate hikes under the law. (Avik Roy, Forbes)

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Reflections on Risk Adjustment, Reinsurance, and Risk Corridors in ObamaCare

fgdfgOn Wednesday, June 18, 2014, I had the pleasure of testifying at the House of Representatives’ Committee on Oversight and Government Reform’s Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation, and Regulatory Affairs. The subcommittee held a hearing it called “Poised to Profit: How ObamaCare Helps Insurance Companies Even If It Fails Patients.”

Much of my testimony was drawn from content in this blog. What struck me was the minority’s emphasis that these provisions, which protect insurers from losing money in ObamaCare, are designed to motivate insurers to offer coverage to sick people.

It is a well-worn talking point of ObamaCare’s supporters that insurers can no longer charge higher premiums or deny coverage to applicants who are expected to have higher health costs, or exclude coverage for pre-existing conditions. Obviously, no insurer will seek to cover these people just because the government wants it to. The market has to be structured to achieve that objective.

Hits and Misses

yogaPractice does not make perfect; meditation does.

Two-thirds of uninsured young adults find health coverage unaffordable; nearly half do not see the value of health insurance.

New study: Cat people are smarter than dog people.

“Walking school buses” being used to combat obesity.

Random thoughts don’t necessarily provide valuable insights.

Health Wonk Review: Certain aspects of ObamaCare might be leading to unintended outcomes that improve medical care.

The Sickest Low-Income Patients Will Pay the Most under ObamaCare

Follprescription-bottleowing up a February study, which showed that people needing drugs on the highest formulary tier will pay much higher out-of-pocket costs than other ObamaCare enrollees, consultants at Avalere have released another study, which shows that the low-income ObamaCare enrollees will suffer this effect even more than middle-class ones.

A formulary is a list of drugs that a health plan covers. It can be divided into up to four tiers. Drugs on the lowest tier (usually generic medicines) cost the least out of pocket, while those on the highest tier cost the most. However, those on the highest tier are the most expensive, and often indicated for those suffering the worst diseases.

Medicaid Spending More Than Doubled, 1999-2010

Sometimes a picture tells a thousand words. And this growth in Medicaid dependency happened mostly during a Republican Administration, well before ObamaCare’s expansion. And the trend from 2006 through 2010 is straight. That is, the 2008 financial crisis and subsequent recession did not cause the expansion. It’s just what our government does, apparently.

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More on Medicare’s Latest Data Dump

Yesterday, we noted the New York Times‘ analysis of hospital charges from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) latest data dump. The same data dump showed how the amounts Medicare paid to hospitals and other providers for different services. The Hill‘s Ferdous Al-Faruque has pointed out some extreme differences:

health-care-costsThe agency found wide discrepancies in how much services cost in different regions of the nation and within the same geographic area. In 2012 a major joint replacement surgery cost Medicare $15,901 in Baltimore while the same procedure cost $239,138 in Los Angeles, the report says.

This variation appears too extreme. If it is a quality difference, surely the lower-quality provider is so bad that it should not be accepting patients! The seeming arbitrariness of Medicare payments might be one good explanation for the variance in costs observed by the Dartmouth Health Atlas team.

Like the physician data dump, for which we praised CMS, this is a treasure trove of data. CMS has also presented the data in a reasonably user-friendly way. It took me less than ten minutes to figure out the dashboard, which allows users to make charts and tables of almost any shape and size.

Well done, CMS. Keep ‘em coming.