Tag: "Medicaid"

Only 20 to 40 Cents of Each Medicaid Dollar Benefits Recipients

One of the problems with Medicaid is that it does not appear to improve recipients’ health (although the evidence can be described as mixed). The best evidence on Medicaid comes from Oregon, which ran a lottery to allow eligible people to enroll. This approximates a randomized clinical trial, the gold standard of clinical research and hard to achieve when examining the real world. Plenty of research indicates that the Oregon Medicaid did not improve health outcomes very much.

The original researchers continue to publish results, and have written a paper that might offer the best explanation why Medicaid does so little. Only 20 to 40 cents of Medicaid spending actually goes towards patients’ welfare:

Repealing Obamacare Would Grow Economy; Reduce Number of Insured by 10 Million

I have asked, and the Congressional Budget Office has answered.

I have been urging the CBO to do a comprehensive estimate of all the effects of the Affordable Care Act, effectively for the first time since 2012. It did so last week. The main take-away is that “repealing the ACA would increase GDP by about 0.7 percent in the 2021–2025 period, mostly because provisions of the law that are expected to reduce the supply of labor would be repealed.”

CBO concludes repeal would increase deficits. However, this effect is much smaller than previous estimates, because this is the first time CBO has used so-called “dynamic scoring” – taking macroeconomic effects of repeal into account – instead of just the simple (“static”) book-keeping type of estimate:

U.S. Busts 243 Providers for $713 Million Medicare, Medicaid Fraud

man-in-wheelchairThis blog does not often congratulate the Obama administration. However, it has been relatively successful at prosecuting Medicare fraud through old-fashioned, gum-shoe type investigations.

From yesterday’s news:

In Miami, the owners of a mental-health treatment center allegedly billed Medicare for tens of millions of dollars’ worth of intensive therapy that actually involved just moving people to different locations. Some of them had dementia so severe that they couldn’t even communicate.

And in Michigan, another physician allegedly prescribed unnecessary narcotic painkillers in return for the use of his patients’ IDs to generate additional false billings. When they tried to escape the scheme, authorities say, he threatened to cut off the medications, to which his patients were addicted.

In the single largest crackdown in an eight-year campaign against health-care fraud, the Justice Department charged 243 people Thursday with $712 million in false billings to Medicare — the medical insurance program for the elderly — and Medicaid, which serves the poor. (Lenny Bernstein & Sari Horwitz, “Government arrests 243 in largest crackdown on health-care fraud,” Washington Post, June 18, 2015)

Medicaid Paid $9.6 Million for Dead Patients

From the statement of Seto Bagdoyan, Director, Forensic Audits and Investigative Service (June 2, 2015):

Approximately 8,600 beneficiaries received benefits worth about $18.3 million concurrently in two or more states –- even though federal regulations do not permit beneficiaries to have payments made on their behalf by two or more states concurrently.

…… our work raises concerns about whether payments made on behalf of certain beneficiaries were appropriate, including the following:

  • The identities of about 200 beneficiaries received $9.6 million worth of Medicaid benefits subsequent to the beneficiary’s death, based on our matching Medicaid data to SSA’s full DMF.

  • About 3,600 beneficiaries supposedly received about $4.2 million worth of Medicaid services while incarcerated in a state prison facility even though federal law prohibits states from obtaining federal Medicaid matching funds for health-care services provided to inmates except when they are patients in medical institutions.

  • Hundreds of thousands of beneficiaries had irregularities in their address and identifying information, such as addresses that did not match any United States Postal Service records and Social Security numbers that did not match identity information contained in SSA databases.

Further:  About 90 providers had suspended or revoked licenses in the state where they performed Medicaid services yet they received a combined total of at least $2.8 million from those states in fiscal year 2011.

The Human Face of Medicaid’s Poverty Trap

NCPA has long recommended a universal, refundable tax credit to replace welfare programs that impose effectively high marginal income tax rates on their dependents. A story from Chicago shows the human cost of Medicaid’s poverty trap:

McDonald’s grill cook Douglas Hunter is literally the poster child for a $15 minimum wage: The Chicago man’s picture and story are featured in the “Fight for $15″ national campaign.

Hunter’s minimum pay goes to $10 an hour in July, but a steep pay raise would bring unintended consequences for Hunter, a diabetic with multiple medical conditions whose care is covered by Cook County’s program for the uninsured and poor.

So any salary gains could be wiped out by the price of his medications and supplies, including two kinds of insulin at $403 a month and drugs to control high cholesterol and blood pressure that add an extra $330 a month.

And that’s not including the syringes, health checkups and eyeglasses he receives for free, allowing him to avoid choosing between maintaining his health and providing for his teenager.

At $15, he figures he’d need to reduce his total work hours to ensure his new income didn’t disqualify him from his current benefits. (Don Lee, “For this McDonald’s cook, wage hike could do more harm than help,” Los Angeles Times, June 1, 2015)

Health Insurance Consolidation Begins With A Bang

Just last Thursday, I wrote about the forthcoming consolidation in U.S. health insurance. My thesis was that only large, centralized, politically powerful insurers could continue to thrive.

With perfect timing, Humana, Inc., announced on Friday that it was putting itself on the block, and the shares rallied about twenty percent. They continue to climb today.

“Because of the Affordable Care Act, the whole insurance market is shifting towards a lower margin model,” said Chris Rigg, an analyst with Susquehanna Financial Group. “Generally speaking, the bigger you are, the better.” (Michael J. de la Merced & Julie Creswell, New York Times DealBook, May 29, 2015)

Commonwealth Fund: “Underinsurance” Unchanged Under Obamacare

Yet another pro-Obamacare organization has had to publish a study indicating that Obamacare is failing to achieve its objectives. I recently discussed Families USA’s report that one third of low income families cannot afford care under Obamacare.

This time it is the Commonwealth Fund, inventor of the notion of “underinsurance,” which is defined as out-of-pocket health costs (excluding premiums) comprising at least 10 percent of household income, or five percent if household income is less than 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Level.

In 2014, the proportion of so-called “underinsured”, aged 18-64, was 23 percent – exactly the same as in 2012 and just one percentage point more than in 2010.

Ex2

Families USA: One Third of Low-Income Obamacare Beneficiaries Cannot Afford Care

One of Obamacare’s biggest cheerleaders, Families USA, has published new research showing that one third of low-income Obamacare beneficiaries have not obtained medical care due to cost in 2014:

Lower- to middle-income adults who were insured for the full year were significantly more likely than those with higher incomes to forgo needed care because they could not afford it: Nearly one-third (32.3 percent) of lower- to middle-income adults didn’t get needed medical care (excluding dental care) because they could not afford it. (p. 14)

But don’t you worry, Families USA has not thrown in the towel on Obamacare yet:

Since its passage in 2010, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has made tremendous progress in improving access to health insurance and health care for millions of Americans. Approximately 14.1 million previously uninsured Americans gained health insurance between the beginning of open enrollment in October 2013 and March 4, 2015.

Well, not actually: Most of the Obamacare “insured” have actually fallen into welfare dependency (Medicaid), and the increase in privately insured is questionable.

Families USA recommends that even more taxpayer-funded healthcare dollars be channeled through health insurers. Investors in health insurers must love these policy prescriptions from progressive advocacy groups.

Washington, DC: Rich World’s Worst Capital for Infant Mortality

Save the Children has a new report ranking 25 of the world’s richest capital cities by childhood mortality. Washington, DC is the worst. Prague, Stockholm, Oslo, Tokyo, and Lisbon lead.

But I think the international ranking was just to get headlines. The real point of the report is to emphasize differences in infant mortality between rich neighborhoods and poor neighborhoods in these rich capitals:

  • In examining infant deaths in D.C., Save the Children found that in 2012 the infant mortality rate in DC’s poorest neighborhood (Ward 8) was more than 10 times higher than the rate in DC’s wealthiest community (Ward 3).

  • In 2012 the infant mortality rate in ward 8 was 14.9 deaths per 1,000 live births. In contrast in Ward 3, the city’s wealthiest ward, the rate was 1.2 deaths per 1,000 live births.

I suppose that many will use this report to call for increases in Medicaid spending, which has increased relentlessly over the years without eliminating this difference.

 

House & Senate Agree on Balanced Budget Resolution

The House and Senate Budget Committees have announced that their conference committee has agreed on a balanced budget resolution. The conference report is 106 pages, so it will take me a few days to complete an analysis.

Nevertheless, it is important to recognize that this is an important achievement and the result of a lot of hard work by Dr. Price, Senator Enzi, their colleagues and staff. For many years, the Senate ignored its legal obligation to pass a budget.

With respect to health care, the resolution repeals and replaces Obamacare in full. It also continues to increase Medicare premiums for high-income households, and transitions to Paul Ryan’s “premium support” model for future beneficiaries.

One of the items I had been hoping for is offsets to pay for the bungled Medicare “doc fix” of last month. The resolution states that it accounts for the full cost of that “doc fix” (page 45). Okay, but the current president will not sign this budget. Are we meant to expect that the next President will take responsibility for the unfunded spending authority this Congress gave President Obama?