Tag: "ObamaCare"

Seven ObamaCare Taxes That Are Hiking Health-Insurance Premiums This Year

Ahealth-care-costsmerican Action Forum’s Robert Book analyzes how seven ObamaCare taxes contribute to higher health-insurance premiums in 2014. The results?

  • ObamaCare exchange premiums are $354 higher,
  • Fully insured employer-based premiums are $196 higher, and
  • Self-insured employer-based premiums are $94 higher.

Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

Why thretirement-crackede disabled on Medicaid can’t afford to retire. Here’s how Chile solved that problem.

ObamaCare pushes doctors and hospitals to consolidate; then the FTC and the DOJ claim they’ve violated anti-trust law.

30 percent fewer “young invincibles” enrolled in ObamaCare than expected; administration gets two Pinocchios.

More than 1,100 IRS employees who owe back taxes received more than $1 million in bonuses and more than 10,000 hours in time-off awards.

Hits and Misses

Smiling NurseThree more states — Connecticut, Nebraska and New York — are in the process of allowing nurse practitioners to work without oversight from a doctor, in an effort to alleviate physician shortages.

Tom Sargent summarizes economics in 335 words. Or is it 297 words?

eHealth, Inc., an online insurance broker, is ObamaCare’s biggest winner.

If we had a drug to delay Alzheimer’s by five years, annual treatment costs would drop by almost half a trillion dollars a year.

Headlines I Wish I Hadn’t Seen

prescription-drugsPrices for a dozen generic drugs jumped 2,000 percent in one year: FDA to blame.

Users report better experience on broken state ObamaCare exchanges than federal healthcare.gov exchange.

Did Kathleen Sebelius request kickbacks from H&R block for enrolling ObamaCare applicants?

Man covered by ObamaCare owes half the cost of a $54,000 helicopter ambulance bill.

The Heartbleed virus infected Heatlhcare.gov: ObamaCare exchange enrollees advised to change passwords.

Why ObamaCare is Never Likely to be Popular

Jonathan Bernstein at Bloomberg View:

Caduceus with First-aid KitFor most of us, ObamaCare isn’t that visible, and the benefits often are the least visible part. The biggest winners are probably those on expanded Medicaid, and I’m confident many of them don’t know they were helped by ObamaCare. Don’t expect it to get better; it’s going to be less and less likely that people will identify the benefits they are receiving with “ObamaCare.” In five years, plenty of those in the exchanges won’t realize that under the old system they would have had a pre-existing condition that would have barred them from being insured. Even if they realize that such a restriction once existed, they almost certainly won’t realize that their minor medical condition would have qualified.

Given all that, once Republican opposition guaranteed that the ACA would be controversial it was likely that it would poll badly, even if it worked well — and even if it worked so well it couldn’t be repealed.

Employers Switch from Commercial Insurance to Self-Insured Plans

According to Citibank’s top ranked analyst Carl McDonald:

By our analysis, since 2002, risk enrollment at the publicly traded plans has fallen by over 14 million lives…The emergence of private exchanges that rely on a risk model (like the exchange product offered by Aon Hewitt) could help slow the loss of risk enrollment but the benefits of self-funding are so significant for many employers that we believe risk enrollment will continue to shrink.

Cooking the ObamaCare Stats?

caduceus_blogOut of the blue, the Census Bureau has changed how it counts health insurance — at the precise moment when ObamaCare is roiling the insurance markets.

Since 1987, the Current Population Survey, or CPS, has collected information on the health-insurance coverage status of Americans. The annual reports are widely cited because their large sample sizes improve accuracy, the data are gathered constantly, and they tease out state-by-state details. But this year the Census revamped the CPS household insurance questions, muddying comparisons between the pre- and post-ObamaCare numbers. The results of the new method will be disclosed this fall. (WSJ)

The Cost of ObamaCare Is Down 8%, but That May Not Be Good News

But so is access to doctors and hospitals in the plans offered on the health insurance exchanges.

A Congressional Budget Office report estimates lower federal spending (see the figure). The reason: Health plans in the exchanges look more like Medicaid than like employer-based coverage. Jason Millman reports:

The CBO report points out that it previously thought ObamaCare’s exchange plans would look more like employer-based coverage, but that hasn’t turned out to be the case so far — hence, the cheaper premiums. “The plans being offered through the exchanges this year appear to have, in general, lower payment rates for providers, narrower networks of providers, and tighter management of their subscribers’ use of health care than employment-based plans,” CBO wrote.

The CBO projects 42 million people will remain uninsured this year. In fact, the ACA will never cover more than 45% of the uninsured.

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Deductibles in ObamaCare Exchanges

dfgFrom the Heritage Foundation, ObamaCare in Pictures.

Bobby Jindal’s Health Reform

The plan begins by repealing ObamaCare. It would also “guarantee access” to people with pre-existing conditions, through a “high-risk pool, reinsurance, or some other method ensuring those with chronic conditions can obtain needed care.”

Like the Republican Study Committee’s plan, Jindal’s proposal replaces the current exclusion of employer-based tax benefits with a standard tax deduction. The problems:

  • It is regressive, giving more tax relief, the higher your income tax bracket.
  • It is not helpful to the half of the population that does not pay income tax.

Now that ObamaCare has handed out tax credits to millions of people in the health-insurance exchanges, the total effect of the plan would likely be to take insurance away from a large proportion of the people insured through the exchanges, as well as all the people covered by ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion. By election day, it would probably un-insure ten million people.