This is What the NCPA Recommended Every State Should Do

[Gov. Scott] Walker’s plan opens up Medicaid in Wisconsin to about 83,000 poor, childless adults. They were previously locked out Recommendation-Lettersbecause of a cap on the number of people who could be in the program. At the same time, Walker announced that Medicaid is being cancelled for 77,000 people who have incomes above the poverty line.

Walker’s maneuver is possible because Wisconsin’s Medicaid program was already one of the more inclusive ones in the country. It allowed people making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level to be covered by BadgerCare. Now he wants to roll BadgerCare eligibility back to 100 percent of the poverty line, and put everyone making between 100 percent and 200 percent — a range of $11,490 to $22,980 for a single person — into private, subsidized coverage that they buy on the new [health insurance exchange]. (KHN)

See NCPA’s advice to Rick Perry here.

Comments (10)

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  1. Trent says:

    I wonder what the popular opinion will be on his decision

  2. Lucas says:

    He’s rejecting federal funding and getting criticized…the state obviously realizes it can do well without it. And if they can, so can any of the other states.

    • Trent says:

      But if it’s offered, wouldn’t it be in the states best interest to provide more coverage?

      • Lucas says:

        He would be selling out what he believes in, and he obviously believes he can take the state in a more positive direction without the funding.

  3. Connor says:

    “Walker’s maneuver is possible because Wisconsin’s Medicaid program was already one of the more inclusive ones in the country. It allowed people making up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level to be covered by BadgerCare.”

    That’s crazy. No wonder he had so much wiggle room